Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Why You May Need To See The Dentist More Frequently

GOING TO THE DENTIST TWICE A YEAR, while a good rule of thumb, is not necessarily fitting for everyone. Depending on certain lifestyle choices and medical conditions, some people need to see their dentist even more frequently.

Fifty years ago, there were really no instructions as to how often you should see a dentist. Back then, dentistry was more about fixing existing problems rather than preventing them from occurring. When dentists began recommending biannual check-ups and cleanings as a preventive measure against oral disease and infection, the American population’s dental health vastly improved. However, that doesn’t mean that this twice a year recommendation is a “one size fits all” umbrella.

Who Needs To Go More Than Twice A Year?

There are a number of conditions and circumstances that may require more frequent dental visits. Listed below are people who should talk to their dentist about going more than twice a year:
  • Diabetics
  • Smokers
  • Pregnant women
  • People with gum disease
  • People who have dry mouth
  • People with a weak immune response to bacterial infection
  • People who are more prone to cavities or plaque buildup
  • People who do not keep up with their dental hygiene very well
  • People whose diet is rich in sugary foods and/or drinks

Some people may need to go biannually one year and, due to changing circumstances, need to go more frequently the next. For example, as we get older and start to accumulate more health issues, we might be more prone to damage that bacteria can cause to our teeth and gums. Furthermore, many medications can cause dry mouth which makes it easier for bacteria to grow.

How often you need to make a dental visit is determined by your dentist and hygienist and is based on the health of your gums, as well as how committed you are to a good oral hygiene program. More frequent visits, especially for high-risk patients, can prevent tooth decay, gum disease, and other oral health conditions. The preventive care we provide will save you time, stress, and money.

You Are Unique

You are a unique individual! Keeping your smile healthy means addressing your unique needs. We are not interested in a “one size fits all” mentality. Our practice is devoted to providing you with the best and most specialized care.

Thanks for being our valued patients and friends!


The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

Cavities All Of A Sudden?

SOMEONE CAN GO THEIR WHOLE LIFE without having a cavity, and seemingly out of nowhere find themselves at the dentist for a filling or two. How does this happen?

Here are some reasons your dental status might be in sudden flux:

Changes In Your Daily Routine

The stress of changes in your daily routine, like starting a new job, starting school, or starting a new habit, can adversely affect your health—oral health included. It may even be the reason for the sudden appearance of a cavity.

Stress affects us all differently, but a common side effect is experiencing a dry mouth. When your mouth is dry, there is an absence of saliva, which helps neutralize the acids in your mouth that cause tooth decay and cavities. If you're experiencing some of these changes or exercising more than usual, make sure you’re getting enough water to drink throughout the day to prevent a dry mouth.

A New Diet

Another reason for unforeseen cavities may be a change in diet. Are you consuming more acidic foods or drinks? Some common culprits are citrus fruits, tomato sauce, and sports drinks. What about more frequent consumption of sugar or soda? The amount of sugar you eat matters less to dental health as the time of exposure does. Sipping on soda all day can be worse than eating a large chocolate bar all at once.


If you have a sore throat or the flu, sucking on cough drops all day long can easily cause cavities. Chemotherapy is also a common offender and in many cases results in dry mouth, making one more prone to cavities.

Changes In Dental Habits

Are you brushing and flossing your teeth regularly and with the proper technique? This one goes without saying. Make sure your home hygiene routine is up to par.

Avoid overbrushing as it can damage your teeth and may result in cavities. If you brush more vigorously than necessary, you risk cutting away the protective enamel of the tooth, making it more vulnerable to decay.

Gum recession is also a result of overly aggressive brushing. Receding gums expose the root of the tooth that is usually below the gumline. The root does not have the enamel covering like the rest of your tooth, which protects it from cavities.

Additionally, if you’ve recently gotten braces, you may have noticed that it’s harder to floss and brush than it used to be. Talk to us about how you can improve your technique so that braces don’t interfere with your dental hygiene.

We’re Here To Help

Getting to the root of the problem is the most important thing when it comes to your dental health. We’re here to work with you in treating and preventing tooth decay, so that you can have a healthy life and a cavity-free smile!

Thank you for being our valued patient and friend!


The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

What You Should Know About Your Child's Loose Tooth

DO YOU REMEMBER losing your baby teeth? For children, it is an extremely important milestone that symbolizes becoming a “big kid!” Losing their first tooth—and every tooth after that—is a special moment, not only because they’ll be receiving a visit from the tooth fairy, but also because it is a sign they are growing up.

Here’s some information to help you and your child get through this phase with a smile!

Let It Happen Naturally

Many parents wonder if they should be trying to get their child’s baby teeth out as soon as possible after they become loose. A child’s baby teeth fall out naturally and oftentimes painlessly if we simply let nature take its course. Usually, a baby tooth becomes loose while a permanent tooth starts coming in. This causes the roots of the baby tooth to dissolve until the tooth is loose enough to fall out painlessly.

It may take a few months for the baby tooth to become loose enough to fall out. You can encourage your child to wiggle the tooth to loosen it, but don’t try to force it. For example, don’t pull the classic “tie your tooth to the door knob” stunt. If the root is only half dissolved, and therefore not ready to fall out yet, it could break and become infected if yanked out abruptly.

Knocked Out Baby Teeth Require Special Attention

If your child’s baby tooth was knocked out long before it would have fallen out, it may be a good idea to visit us to get it checked out. When a tooth is prematurely knocked out, there is a risk of infection and damage to the permanent tooth.

We Want The Best For Your Child’s Smile

This is an exciting time for your child! Getting presents from the tooth fairy as well as having their permanent teeth grow in are special moments for them. As your trusted dental practice, we are here to make these experiences as positive as they can be for both you and your child!

Thank you for reading our blog and being a valued patient and friend! We appreciate you.


The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Tuesday, November 3, 2015

How To Make Brushing More Fun!

BRUSHING YOUR TEETH twice a day for two minutes is an important practice that helps keep your smile bright and healthy. But, does it have to be boring? We certainly don’t think so!

Brush For A Full Two Minutes

Using proper brushing technique for at least two minutes is necessary to ensure that all tooth surfaces are properly cleaned.

Sometimes we may be tempted to speed through our morning routine and brush a bit more vigorously to make up the difference. Brushing too aggressively, however, can lead to gum recession, tooth decay, or more serious oral health concerns. So, how do we make brushing for the full two minutes more fun?

Fun Tips To Make The Time Fly By
  • Brush to the beat! Brushing your teeth to your favorite song can help those two minutes fly by.
  • Use an app. The Oral-B™ brushing app, for example, times your brushing for you while letting you scroll through the news.
  • Exercise. (Yes, exercise!) Some people choose to stretch, do calf raises or even squats while they brush.
  • Read, watch television or stream videos. Taking your mind off of watching the clock helps brushing go by more quickly.

What About The Kids?

Making brushing fun for you is one thing, for kids it can be even harder. So, what can we do as parents to help our kids enjoy those two minutes of brushing in their morning and nightly routine?
  • Participation. Having your kids push the button on the timer or put the toothpaste on the toothbrush are small gestures that make it more fun for them.
  • Make it a game! Help your kids use their imagination while brushing.
  • Offer a reward. For example, give your child points every time they brush. When they reach a certain amount of points, they can earn a special prize!
  • Brush with them! Kids love following the example of their parents and if they see you doing it, they will likely want to do it themselves.

We Love Helping You Care For Your Smile

In the end, it’s all about doing something you enjoy while brushing. Whether it’s reading the news, watching your favorite TV show, or listening to music, brushing those teeth can be quick, beneficial and fun!

If you have any questions about ways to make your oral health routine more enjoyable, feel free to ask! We are committed to providing you with all the tools you need to enjoy a lifetime of happy and healthy smiles.

Thank you for reading our blog and being a valued patient and friend!


The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Monday, October 19, 2015

Give Your Baby A Head Start On Oral Hygiene

IT’S IMPORTANT TO HAVE healthy teeth and gums at any age, but how early should you start to think about your child's oral health? It may be sooner than you think!

Proper Oral Health Care Starts At The Beginning

Infants usually begin teething between six and twelve months old, and caring for your child’s teeth should begin immediately when their pearly whites become visible. Even baby teeth can develop early childhood caries (cavities), and treatment can often be an uncomfortable experience.

This is why it’s important to get your child started on a good oral health regimen before their teeth fully erupt.

No Teeth Doesn’t Mean No Bacteria

Even as his or her first little teeth begin to sprout, oral bacteria begins to settle around their teeth and gums. An infant’s currently erupting teeth do not need a toothbrush, but they do still need to be cleaned. This can be done simply by wiping their gums with a wet washcloth or moistened gauze. Wiping the gums is enough to knock off stubborn plaque and keep their incoming teeth clean.

Choose The Right Toothbrush When The Time Is Right

Once your baby’s first teeth have erupted completely, it is time to introduce an appropriate toothbrush. When choosing your child’s first toothbrush, you should be sure it’s…
  • soft,
  • small-headed,
  • and wide handled.

Children younger than three should use only a smear of fluoride toothpaste. Once they are a little older, a pea-sized amount may be introduced. If your child has trouble spitting out their toothpaste after brushing or if you’re concerned with them swallowing too much, there are plenty of fluoride-free options you can use until they are ready for fluoridated toothpaste.

We’re Here To Help!

Whether you’re wiping their gums or helping them use their first toothbrush, cleaning your child’s teeth should still take place twice per day—especially after eating and before bed. This will help them develop good dental hygiene habits that will help support a lifetime of good oral health.

If you have questions about when to get your baby started with their first toothbrush, feel free to schedule an appointment! We’d love to talk with your about your child’s particular dental needs and help them on their way to a lifetime of excellent oral health.

Thanks for being a part of our practice family!

The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Today is a special day, a day when we celebrate our 1st awesome year in business taking care of the dental needs of our amazing patients. Congrats to us and congrats to our patients, we appreciate all of you!

Monday, September 28, 2015

40 under 40

You would be proud to know that your dentist is awarded and highlighted in the Incisal Edge magazine for 40 under 40... check it out!!!